AG Jackley Explains Medical Cannabis Initiative

Attorney General Marty Jackley has finished his fifth ballot measure explanation, this time for the medical marijuana initiative brought to us by Melissa Mentele and the South Dakota Family Coalition for Compassion. The proposed initiative is a monster, 95 sections laying out the rules for the “regulation, access and compassionate use of cannabis in South Dakota.”

Here’s AG Jackley’s summary of the medical cannabis proposal:

The measure legalizes medical use of marijuana by qualifying patients, including minors. No person or entity may be penalized, or denied any right or privilege, for conduct that is lawful under the measure.

Qualifying patients must be certified by a practitioner as having a debilitating medical condition. South Dakota patients must obtain a registration card from the State Department of Health (“Department”). Non-resident patients are permitted to use their registration cards from other jurisdictions.

Qualifying patients may designate caregivers to assist with their use of marijuana. A designated caregiver must obtain a registration card from the Department for each qualifying patient.

Allowable amounts of marijuana include three ounces of marijuana, a minimum of six marijuana plants (if cultivation is permitted for that cardholder), and quantities of other marijuana products as determined by the Department.

The measure legalizes marijuana testing, manufacturing, and cultivation facilities, as well as dispensaries where marijuana may be acquired by cardholders. These establishments must register with the Department.

Schools and landlords cannot penalize, or refuse to enroll or lease, based solely on a person’s cardholder status, absent federal law to the contrary.

Marijuana possession, use, cultivation and distribution remain illegal under federal law [Attorney General Marty Jackley, ballot measure explanation, 2015.06.09].

196 words—right below the 200-word limit. That cut-off apparently kept AG Jackley from pointing out the negative of what he felt bore emphasizing in his explanations of Bob Newland’s two rhetorical exercises in consistent prohibition, that the medical cannabis measure would appear not to cost the state any tax revenues and would not likely expose the state to costly court challenges.

Compared to the Newland initiative explanations, the medical cannabis explanation is less discouraging and more straightforward, telling us whom the law would authorized to use and grow pot and what for. With that document filed, it should be mere days until cannabis activists can start circulating their petition. Circulators will have until Monday, November 9 of this year to submit at least 13,871 valid voter signatures on their petition to place medical marijuana on the ballot again in 2016.


63 Responses to AG Jackley Explains Medical Cannabis Initiative

  1. larry kurtz

    What prevents the legislature from gutting this if it becomes law?

  2. Nothing prevents the legislature from gutting the bill, repealing it altogether and/or possibly replacing it with their own version. Chances are, if this makes the ballot, some legislators may attempt to address the issue on their own in the next session which gives them a chance to sabotage (or save) the vote ahead of next year’s election. This could be good, bad or a compromise of sorts. Legislators could dig through this language and do some research, and present a much better written proposal or something perhaps that “fits South Dakota better”… These are just my speculations for now.
    I wish the campaign and the state of SD good luck because I know I have family in the state who could greatly benefit from a law like this if it passes.
    Best,
    Emmett

  3. The law regarding medical pot states nothing of growing your own plants. I’d consider a ballot identical to Minnesota’s but not this particular one that can be abused. This will likely be defeated.

  4. Sorry to clarify what I typed above Minnesota’s medical pot law does not state allowing to have pot plants at home for medicinal use. It is tightly regulated to prevent abuse. This initiative looks like it can be easily abused and most likely will fail here in South Dakota.

  5. ” Schools and landlords cannot penalize, or refuse to enroll or lease, based solely on a person’s cardholder status, absent federal law to the contrary.”

    Rental property owners and those who would be neighbors in non smoking buildings will fight like heck to keep smokers out of their buildings that already have rules for non-smoking occupants.

    I’d be curious what the American or South Dakota Lung Association’s stance would be also with another source of indoor 2nd hand smoke.

  6. larry kurtz

    Cannabis is already legal in parts of South Dakota: denying adults access to it outside tribal nations is discriminatory.

  7. larry kurtz

    Patients who qualify for cannabis therapy should be exempt from paying any taxes on that medication while adults who grow or purchase for other reasons should be able to without interference from any government.

  8. Larry,

    “Cannabis is already legal in parts of South Dakota: denying adults access to it outside tribal nations is discriminatory.”

    That seems to be an incredibly broad statement. Which tribal governments have officially fully legalized pot within the state of South Dakota boundaries? Any adult including non tribal members can cross outside of that tribal lands where it is legalized and can have free passage with pot in possession and use wherever they wish?

  9. Lynn – who cares if its abused? What harm will it cause? Is the sky falling in Colorado, Washington….Europe….or during the 10,000 years humans co-existed with the plant without causing irreparable harm to civilization?

    Yes – what we need is big pharma to take over the medical industry…that way, there won’t be abuse….like with oxycotin…doh!

    Sigh….sorry SD, but I’ll never be able to move back unless ya’ll get some common sense.

  10. Lynn – the proposed law indicates landlords can’t penalize a renter nor refuse to lease to them due to their legal ability to smoke. It does not seem to indicate they would be required to allow them to smoke in the property. Thus a non-smoking residence could remain a non-smoking residence… they just can’t discriminate against someone who does smoke (whether that takes place on the sidewalk or in their car for example).

    Hopefully this won’t be an issue, because unlike a medication that is ingested or injected, smoke can and does impact others such as those in the same building that may share an HVAC system.

  11. happy camper

    When I had joint pain and stomach problems marijuana was the best thing to relieve both. The tribes should grow and sell it to Colorado dispensaries: Native Weed! I have a no smoking policy with my rentals. It’s too hard to clean and paint over cigarette smoke. If is doesn’t damage property then more power to em. What about the smell? Is it permanent in a structure? If so, they shouldn’t be able to damage someone’s rental. Like a pet deposit: Cannabis deposit.

  12. Craig,

    Speaking from experience it is much more difficult to rent an apartment that has been smoked in and there are additional costs in cleaning up apartments also getting all that tar and residue off the walls, other surfaces and carpet. There are many tenants that require that their buildings are smoke free and obviously not have any offensive odors upon entering the building, hallways and certainly in their own living space.

  13. SuperSweet

    The idea of legalizing pot gives me joint pain.

  14. mike from iowa

    Congress legalized bribery. Insider trading was good for congressmen and women. South Dakota’s entire wingnut coterie in DC would vote for another illegal war,so let us get them pot to smoke and get them to mellow out. If they won’t watch Sesame and learn to get along,maybe pot will do the trick.

  15. Advocate,

    ” Lynn – who cares if its abused? What harm will it cause? ” There has been abuse in Colorado and ads like this from Weedmaps don’t help in legitimizing . https://weedmaps.com/doctors/cannabis-doctor-long-beach

    Medical Marijuana Doctor open 7 days a week from 11 to 6. Visit our office today for your cannabis recommendation. We offer 24/7 online and phone verification. Our physicians evaluate patients for there marijuana license and marijuana card. Come to the Cannabis Doctor to be evaluated for your medical needs. If our physician determine you qualify for a Marijuana Card, you will receive your Marijuana License same day.

    $25 for renewal. $35 for New Patients

    $25.00? Seriously? This ad was from Long Beach California

  16. Deb Geelsdottir

    MN passed a medical marijuana law last year. Gov. Dayton, a Democrat, was very opposed until he had a personal conversation with a mother and her child who needed the medication. Gov. Dayton signed the bill because very strict regulations were created.

    I believe there are 3-4 businesses allowed to grow it, and 5-6 dispensaries. It may only be sold in oil form. Medical doctors must certify their patients to use the oil. Doctors may choose to refuse to be a part of marijuana use, and at this time, the majority of doctors are not involved. However, the program becomes effective in 3 weeks, July 1. The intervening year was used to create infrastructure both for growing and refining marijuana and building the documentary structure to ensure that the law is followed.

    Pot smokers got nothing. Perhaps if SD tried the MN model they’d be successful. At least they’d probably have a better chance of winning.

  17. Didn’t one of the tribes just make some announcement about how they were planning on cashing in on the issue? I heard they were planning to grow it, harvest it, and sell it on their land and since they have sovereignty I’m not sure if anyone could stop them (I don’t know for certain considering it seems the state still regulates casinos etc.).

    Mark my words – if this happens, our legislature will soon realize how many millions of dollars in lost tax revenue they are missing out on, and they will take steps to pass a law reminiscent of Colorado. The only thing that conservative lawmakers hate more than the idea of someone smoking a plant is missing out on some potential revenue.

  18. mike from iowa

    Can’t the feds interrupt interstate movement of pot between two legal states?

  19. It’s apparent the attacks on the initiative will come from reefers of misinformation – such as Lynn’s statement and Jackley’s inference that landlords may not be able to bar smoking — nothing is further from the truth.

    Portugal decriminalized possession of small quantities of drugs over a decade ago. Crime fell. Addictions fell. Cuba has essentially no drug use, no gun problem, and as few murders per capita as does Canada. Colorado decriminalized possession of small quantities of marijuana – crime fell. Over a hundred years ago the first federal judge in Dakota Territory at Deadwood would not jail drug users lacking evidence of a property or violent crime. The US prohibition-era over-reaction criminalizing minor drug use is an abject failure and needs to end. Meanwhile the SD police, prosecutorial, prison, and legislative industrial complex will seek the counsel of their fears in a full-court press to kill the initiative.

  20. happy camper

    It’s criminal how many felons we’ve created over minor drug use. In SD people will get arrested with more than just a slap on the wrist. True, it’s not legal, but this article says Republican attitudes are changing: http://www.alternet.org/drugs/republican-attitudes-shifting-marijuana-despite-chris-christie-vows

  21. John,

    Misinformation? As I read the proposal

    “The measure legalizes medical use of marijuana by qualifying patients, including minors. No person or entity may be penalized, or denied any right or privilege, for conduct that is lawful under the measure.”

    “Schools and landlords cannot penalize, or refuse to enroll or lease, based solely on a person’s cardholder status, absent federal law to the contrary.”

    I’d like to be sure on this particular point that rental property owners still have the right under the terms of the lease to evict a tenant if they are caught or smoking in a non smoking rental unit regardless if they are smoking tobacco or medical cannabis. The evicted tenant would be legally and financially responsible for the remainder of the lease and the cost to clean the odor out of the apartment. It is a royal pain cleaning up a unit that has been smoked in.

    It’s called protecting an investment and business.

  22. No where does jackley go so far as to proclaim that landlords cannot have smoking bans. He could not say that because it would be untruthful. Heck, nothing can interfere with the right to contract. Put no smoking in the rental contract, one breach, tenant’s out with damages. The proposed law only reads the landlord cannot discriminate because of status. A landlord presently cannot discriminate because of status: female, single parent, non-white, etc. One can always sanction behavior – just not status. This is the type of inferred misinformation that causes otherwise rational folks to seek counsel of their fears in the hyper-conservative world to defeat the initiative. And the SD electorate is well versed in seeking the counsel of their fears.

  23. happy camper

    “This is the type of inferred misinformation that causes otherwise rational folks to seek counsel of their fears in the hyper-conservative world to defeat the initiative.” I just assumed Lynn is a Democrat, but landlording can bring out the Republican in you.

  24. Let’s play jackley’s devils advocate: is his rendition inferring that teachers in schools could smoke in a classroom’s in front of their students? That is the inference from his poorly crafted, manipulative statement. Taken further, could a defendant or bailiff, or observer light-up in open court? The poorly crafted statement and an inference of it may make it appear so. Or in a theater or on an aircraft?

    Point being – where its lawful to smoke, then smoking medical marijuana is also lawful under the proposal; where it is unlawful to smoke it is also unlawful to smoke medical marijuana. Do not let yourself be manipulated by an apparent carnival barker.

  25. John,

    “That is the inference from his poorly crafted, manipulative statement” It was not my intent to misinform but if you really believe I was than so be it. I don’t care. My concern is that with the emphasis on non discrimination for medical reasons that a special exception would be forced upon property owners that have no smoking buildings and it is marketed that was and is included in the lease.

    Regarding a lease I believe communication up front is key to protect the landlord and that particular tenant and other tenants in the building.

  26. HC,

    There are some things I lean progressive and others I’m conservative and/or very practical. lol :)

  27. Is one of the 196 words supposed to be maximum?
    “Allowable amounts of marijuana include… a minimum of six marijuana plants …”

  28. I, too, thought that sounded odd, Barbara, but that’s the word used in the original ballot measure text. It sets a minimum number of plants a cardholder can grow. My assumption here is that they are requiring a provider to be serious and grow enough to provide a steady medical supply.

  29. Porter Lansing

    A “bud of insight” from CO ….. More voters registered in the Republic Party voted to legalize cannabis (also, it’s a constitutional amendment which requires a 75% public vote to overturn, just as a safeguard against an over zealous legislature) than Democrats or Unaffiliated. The support among the “chronically contrary” party remains just as strong, today. Legal weed is a truly bi-partisan issue. :)

  30. happy camper

    You also have to remember what special interest/lobby groups are against its acceptance. Like always, follow the money:

    – Police Unions
    – Private Prison Corporations
    – Alcohol and Beer Companies
    – Pharmaceutical Corporations
    – Prison Guard Unions

    http://www.republicreport.org/2012/marijuana-lobby-illegal/

  31. Bob Newland

    You also have to remember what special interest/lobby groups are against its acceptance. Like always, follow the money:

    – Police Unions
    – Private Prison Corporations
    – Alcohol and Beer Companies
    – Pharmaceutical Corporations
    – Prison Guard Unions…

    …and Lynn, who has no reason except that the whole idea of allowing sick, disabled and dying people some relief from their conditions annoys her, assuming it’s a her.

  32. The attorney general’s explanation says:
    >“Allowable amounts of marijuana include three ounces of marijuana, a minimum of six marijuana plants (if cultivation is permitted for that cardholder), and quantities of other marijuana products as determined by the Department.”

    Cory wrote:
    >“It sets a minimum number of plants a cardholder can grow. My assumption here is that they are requiring a provider to be serious and grow enough to provide a steady medical supply.”

    I interpreted that as a minimum maximum. In other words, if the state department of health permits cultivation for a given cardholder, it shall not set an “allowable” (maximum) amount less than six marijuana plants.

  33. Ryan Janssen

    Regarding the no-smoking rentals:

    Vaproizors folks. It’s the 21st century way of consuming your favorite herb. No smoke, almost no smell and no residue. You won’t bother your neighbors, your roommate or your landlord.

    I suspect vaporizing or edibles are the preferred method for most medical cardholders as they don’t have to inhale combusted plant matter into their lungs to medicate.

  34. Ryan Janssen

    vaproizors = vaporizers

  35. I still can’t get over a physician consultation for $25.00 so he can issue a medical marijuana card. I wonder if they include a bag of chips for that incredibly low fee. lol

    Seriously regarding rental properties vaporizers would be considered the same as smoking leaving an odor and are banned in many cities for indoor use. I’d change the lease to state that the use of a vaporizer is verboten and would result in eviction if caught. If the use of edible marijuana were legalized I’d have no problem with that.

  36. Bob Newland,

    she :)

  37. Ms. Lynn has some interesting and valid views on this topic.

    Mr. Newland, like that fellow on television said: The “Bob Loblaw Law Blog”. You, sir, are a mouthful.

  38. Ryan Janssen

    That’s the thing Lynn… They aren’t the same thing as smoking and do not leave an odor. Banning vaporizer use would be similar to banning cooking in a rental unit. Cooking has an odor that’s exponentially stronger and longer lasting than vaporizing. If you own rental units you’re free to require no smoking and no vaping as part of the rental agreement. It’s possible that you could be opening yourself to potential legal challenges if a medical cardholder has some money to blow and a point to prove.

    I mean no offense when I say this, but it would seem you are commenting on a subject that you lack experience with. I respect your opinion, however it seems as if your opinion is formed on emotions rather than fact. The facts are that vaporizing cannabis leaves no residue, no odor and produce zero smoke. Maybe your vaporizer is different? If so I’d try lowering the temp to below combustion temps. ;-P

    Yes, the $25 fee is a joke because cannabis prohibition is a joke. It’s by and large a harmless substance. We all know there are countless recreational users obtaining medical cards. And why wouldn’t they? Imagine if you could have gotten a prescription easily for alcohol during prohibition. You don’t think people would be storming the alcohol friendly doctors so they could imbibe legally?

  39. Bob Newland

    No, grudz, she doesn’t.

  40. Bob Newland

    Yeah. What Ryan Janssen said.

  41. We need to get to a point where we incarcerate those we fear and deal with those we don’t like.

    80,000 per inmate creates many opportunities. Between the cartels and the judicial/prison industry, I don’t know who is more corrupt.

  42. Ryan,

    I don’t smoke or vaporize anything and never have. Actually none of my friends smoke pot.

    It’s interesting that cities are banning vaporizers at indoor public places with concerns of toxic fumes as one of the issues. The Navy has banned them on Submarines and a few cities are proposing that they are banned in apartment buildings. I’ll check with our attorney and options could include contacting other rental property owners if there is a need for legislation, or refuse to allow on my property as clearly stated when contacted for an apartment and let our attorney deal with it if someone has an issue with it. Again my concern is protecting an investment, business and tenants.

    http://esmokersclub.com/new-rules-and-regulations-on-smoking-e-cigarettes/

    http://www.startribune.com/minneapolis-could-crack-down-on-e-cigarettes/277383551/

  43. Ryan Janssen

    I understand. Personally I believe it’s within your rights as a property owner to require that people agree to refrain from vaporizing to rent from you. I highly doubt you’d face any serious legal challenges but there is potential if it’s considered medicine.

    I can see banning vaporizers on a submarine. Fortunately the general population doesn’t live in submarines.

    Banning vaporizers in public places is silly and is probably more a result of anti-smoking movements than any potential danger. Nicotine vaporizers contain (medical grade) propylene glycol, water and nicotine. Propylene glycol is also used in inhalers and is commonly found in food products. I won’t argue that using a vaporizer is healthier than not putting any foreign objects in your lungs but it’s certainly magnitudes better than smoking. When you vaporize plant matter (commonly cannabis) it’s akin to cooking with oregano or any other herb. You can smell it, but that doesn’t mean you’re burning it or producing smoke. Vaporizing plant material heats the flower to a temp that releases certain parts of the plant but does not combust it. Thus, no smoke, strong odor or tar residue.

    Lastly, kudos to you for never getting hooked on smoking.

  44. barry freed

    This explanation is too soft. Where, like the last IM, are the: “Roots in Hell”, “Men will grow breasts from holding their breath”, and “It’ll stink up our rentals”?

    Do they have their people in place to run the grow operations and dispensaries already?

  45. bearcreekbat

    Since this thread is about legalizing medical marijuana I again ask Lynn if you have reviewed the materials I provided earlier from the National Geographic that identifies children who had their lives saved or radically improved from using marijuana extracts. Here is another link in case you haven’t read it.

    http://proof.nationalgeographic.com/2015/06/10/a-photographer-addicted-to-telling-the-story-of-marijuana/?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=Social&utm_content=link_fbp20150611proof-marijuana&utm_campaign=Content&sf9904332=1

    I am still interested in your reaction to this information. Do you still think it would be a mistake to help sick children by legalizing medical marijuana?

  46. larry kurtz

    Lynn’s not experiencing cannabis and preaching abstinence = priest counseling couples on sexual dysfunction.

  47. Larry,

    I like having my mind sharp and not in an altered state to experience the highs and lows in life to appreciate the blessing there are in life. If I’m having a bad day or whatever negative that happens I’m not going to drunk or stoned.

  48. If Lynn has no compassion for the sick and infirm it would be a long shot to expect something different for a child, Bear. Psychotropics, pain, anti depression, anxiety………I have no idea how many of these can be medicated by cannabis but believe the pharmys make the entire host of illegals look like child’s play from both financial and addiction impacts.

    The U.S. hosts more prisons and prisoners than all but a handful of nations. Why do we continue to spend billions locking up nonviolent offenders, mostly only offenders because of federal laws on the likes of cannabis.

  49. As I’ve mentioned before ad nauseam I would be willing to consider what Minnesota has for medical Cannabis law but not as this ballot measure is written. I will not support a version that has a potential for abuse in that it can be vaporized or smoked.

    “Yes, the $25 fee is a joke because cannabis prohibition is a joke. It’s by and large a harmless substance. We all know there are countless recreational users obtaining medical cards.” Ryan admitted the obvious up above.

    I really like Mayor Allender’s idea that those caught with a small amount of pot are sent to addiction treatment and if need be repeatedly. Those who are caught dealing lock em up!

    While medical Cannabis can help some people unfortunately there are claims that are wildly overblown in an effort to push for legalization. It is well known that after years of trying NORML tried a different strategy to first sell the public on medical marijuana to soften them up to open the door for full legalization.

    Colorado and Washington will provide a great social experiment to see the long term affects of full legalization and what the true social costs will be. I support waiting 10 – 20 years after extensive hard data to see what works and what doesn’t for medicinal benefits. Throwing a guilt trip or trying to manipulate this won’t work on me. There are far greater negative risks and consequences at stake.

  50. Bill Dithmer

    First for the thread. Poor description on Jackleys part, the only thing missing is the seal from a pharmaceutical company.

    A vaporizer is only as effecient as the person driving it. While some people can handle the intricacies of a conduction vaporizer, most only know how to get high. These types of vaporizers heat the matériel in the trough with direct heat and it takes a while to get the hang of it without cumbustion. This is an example of a conduction vaporizer. http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=z-qaDwxgQVE. I dont know anybody that can say they can use a conduction vap and never smell it.

    On the other hand, a convection vaporizer heats the air that then heats the material. Most of these vaps have temperature controls that can take the stupidity out of vaping as long as they are turned down to the point that nothing cumbust. This is an example of a covection vaporizer. http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=q9U3GxjMIm8. Not fool proof but I know for a fact that I could set in the same room as any of you and if you weren’t looking when I did it, you would never know, its that good!

    I have used both of those vaps, and I haven’t smoked papers or a pipe or a bong in four years. You can trust anyone with the covection vap, but your asking for teouble if they use the conduction one, they will burn the material almost every time.

    If its a plant, you can vap it. My favorite is ground coffee. If you want the best tasting coffee you have ever tasted try vaping it once. Of course tobacco is popular to vap to but I’m not into that much because the THC and nicotine work against each other when I’m treating for migraines.

    If your talking about outlawing vaporizers in housing, you have to remember that if there was a script written, and a vap is the only alternative to pills, that would be no different then vaping any other medicines as a delivery system.

    I guess you could just rent to people that didnt smoke, didnt drink, didnt use any type of pharmaceuticals, didnt cook, and never had sex, that would sure be a fun place to live but it wouldnt smell.

    If you dont want to come in contact with people that use cannabis, stay home. Its in church, its at the mall, its at the lawyers office and when the judge climbs down off his bench statistically he or she is using at the same rate as the rest of us, or US.

    “I will not support a version that has a potential for abuse in that it can be vaporized or smoked.” How much pharmaceutical stock do you have anyway?

    If we outlaw things that can be abused, the list would be long and effects would be felt imidiatly.

    How about cars?
    Or gambling?
    Sex?
    Should we get rid of the net?

    I can keep this up for a long time. By the way do you suppose that anyone has ever abused viagra? Maybe we should have the sex police make door to door “observations” to save us from this awful abuse.

    “Do they have their people in place to run the grow operations and dispensaries already?”

    No Barry, but your on the right page, they are getting close.

    I dont know what to say Lynn other then ignorance is bliss. However, there is a big difference between not knowing, and not wanting to know. You dont want to know.

    The Blindman

  51. Bill Dithmer

    “I like having my mind sharp and not in an altered state to experience the highs and “lows in life to appreciate the blessing there are in life.”

    Then your saying you never drink coffee, or tea, or pop? You know that your thyroid is working ok, and all the chemicals in your body are in balance? Do you ever have pain? If so your mind isnt to sharp when your in pain. How about PMS? Not enough sleep? And the list of things that take up brain capacity are endless.

    For me, we know from all the test that as soon as I open my eyes my IQ drops by anywhere from 15% to 30%. The reason for this is that my eyes wiggle so much that in order for me to see a stable image it takes some of my intelligence to keep that picture stable. Who knows I might even hit triple digits in IQ if I just stopped opening my eyes.

    “If I’m having a bad day or whatever negative that happens I’m not going to drunk or stoned.”

    I guess my question is what do you do? Work the blogs? Walk or run? Eat? Why is your way of treating a bad day ok when it also changes your brains chemistry?

    If cannabonoids in cannabis are bad for you, why do our bodies produce cannabonoids? And why do we have built in cannabonoid receptors? If you can answer these questions feel free to preach to me about pot.

    The Blindman

  52. bearcreekbat

    Lynn, thanks for your response. I hadn’t thought about trying to make you or anyone else feel guilty, but I guess I can see how rejecting help for sick kids might make someone feel that way. Ten or twelve years is a long time in a child’s life. I just can’t get my own head around allowing children to suffer for years from potentially fatal repeated seizures simply to ease the worrying mind of a healthy adult.

  53. Bob Newland

    It’s unlikely that anything will make Lynn feel guilty about her intolerance of the behavior of others that has no effect on her life. Living a superior type of life with no bad habits will affect one’s ability to feel guilt.

  54. Porter Lansing

    54 comments and counting? Apparently there’s little lethargy concerning this issue on Mr. Heidelberger’s blog. My last “nug” is this. Consider the two states that legalized cannabis first. Colorado and Washington. Colorado is an aerospace state and Washington is a high tech state. Both enjoy citizens who’re not averse to figuring ways to get a project accomplished. Both enjoy citizens who see the possibilities not dwell on negativity and contrary direction. Many problems arose while traversing the mountain of legal marijuana legislation (pot has been legal here in some form since November 2000) but careful and considerate dissection of each issue led to proper and equitable solutions each and every time; which are bringing in three million dollars a month in taxes that go to building and maintaining our schools. This is why I don’t believe South Dakota is a good place for medical or retail cannabis, at this time. If it’s going to be like Obamacare and get challenged, thrown shade on and rebuked at every turn why take something that benefits so many and subject it to hateful disrespect? Citizens of South Dakota know where to go to get abortions and they know where to go to get marijuana. It’s been this way for 50 years and the climate and culture show little effort to change.

  55. Bob Newland

    I agree, Porter. It’s been this way for 50 years. Therefore, I am going to shoot myself.

  56. Ryan Janssen

    Porter has a valid point. “We get the government we deserve.”

    For the movement as a whole I have to agree to a degree. It’s likely that SD will occupying the caboose on the legal cannabis train as is usual for our state.

    Yes, South Dakotans can acquire pot if they want to. It’s a shame that those that can benefit are missing out on the legit medical strains and other edibles. I can tell you from experience as someone that deals with joint pain and neuropathy that the medical stuff is the real deal. Not everyone has a ‘source’ to acquire these things. For me the purely medical strains have meant the difference between a weekend on the couch and being able to get outdoors and enjoy myself.

    I’m a believer after trying the various lozenges, tootsie roll like chews, etc. These products do not intoxicate but take the pain to a livable level and reduce the spasms, joint pain and muscle tightness that would otherwise cripple me when I’m having a flare. My doctors and specialists are fully aware of my alternative medicine and are surprisingly supportive. I can either take a legal narcotic and all the side effects that come with them or simply suck on a medical mj lozenge and feel improvements within minutes. No intoxication, no mood altering effects and no oxy-haze or withdrawal. Seems like a no-brainer.

  57. Ryan Janssen

    Almost forgot… Of course I tried these medicines in a state where it’s legal and did not transport any legal cannabis products out of said state.

  58. mike from iowa

    Colorado is now an areo-space cadet state. I remember pot illuminating my mind as I sat on the living room floor and listened to music. That was 30 years ago and I remember aches and pains disappearing while I was stoned.

  59. Daniel Buresh

    The anti-pot have joined the leagues of anti-vaccine on their level of ignorance and blatant stupidity. Their basis for being against it is the product of years and years of misinformation and propaganda. That alone should be proof that no amount of legitimate information will change their minds. You can’t require more proof to change your position when you had absolutely NO proof to make the choice to pursue your current position.

  60. Porter Lansing

    Hear, hear Citizen Buresh. (rampant applause is heard). Your poignant comment brings to mind my entry in the new “state motto” contest for South Dakota. It’s a contronym (word or phrase with contradictory meanings) . The new state motto should be, “JUST WATCH” ….. It’s fitting as a command when used by the Republic Party. i.e. “Don’t participate in progress. Don’t pitch in on new projects. Don’t embrace new things and ideas. Stay home, sit back and “JUST WATCH!!!” But, also it’s fitting for we liberals insomuch as it’s a challenge. i.e. “JUST WATCH” what we can accomplish when we gather as a single minded collective! ~ @LiberalDakota

  61. Ryan Janssen

    Lynn,

    In the future if you decide to re-post my words to another site without my permission please extend the common courtesy of letting me know so I can be assured they’re being represented accurately.

    -Ryan

  62. larry kurtz

    At your service, Melissa: whatever it takes.