Best-Looking Attendee of HB 1030 Signing: Rep. Deutsch’s Bike!

Rep. Fred Deutsch (R-4/Florence) submits this photo of one of the better bill signings this session:

Governor Dennis Daugaard (center) signs HB 1030 into law, March 11, 2015. Attending the signing ceremony are (L to R) Megan Myers, government relations director, American Heart Association; Sen. Mike Vehle (R-20/Mitchell); Rep. Fred Deutsch (R-4/Florence); and Dean Krogman, lobbyist.
Governor Dennis Daugaard (center) signs HB 1030 into law, March 11, 2015. Attending the signing ceremony are (L to R) Megan Myers, government relations director, American Heart Association; Sen. Mike Vehle (R-20/Mitchell); Rep. Fred Deutsch (R-4/Florence); and Dean Krogman, lobbyist.

On March 11, Governor Dennis Daugaard signed House Bill 1030 into law, establishing the safe passing distances motorists must maintain between themselves and bicycles. Notice the width of the Governor’s desk and Rep. Deutsch’s Trek Madone, demonstrating the little noticed provision of HB 1030 requiring that lawmakers maintain a gap of three feet when passing a bill.


16 Responses to Best-Looking Attendee of HB 1030 Signing: Rep. Deutsch’s Bike!

  1. Where are the mandatory lights on that Trek? Non compliance with South Dakota law? Nice HED wheels though. Are they those nice riding Ardennes?

  2. Deb Geelsdottir

    Yeah SD Legislature!

    Yes, I said it out loud and in writing, a cheer for the Republican-dominated legislature of deep red SD. I’ll bet the farm, that my family no longer has due to Reagan/Republican Trickle Up Economics, that ALEC had no role in this.

  3. Deb Geelsdottir

    Megan Meyers is attractive too, and she dressed to match the bike!

  4. They should have had that young Ms. Disanto in the picture to spiff it up even more. But golly that looks like a fancy bike with complicated levers that would make all but the most experienced bikers crash in a pile. I bet you Mr. Deutsch can cruise from meeting to meeting in no time down the hallowed halls.

  5. Do you see Rep. DiSanto riding around Rapid City?

  6. I don’t know but I will have to keep an eye out. That would be a sight, indeed. Especially on a bike like that.

  7. Megan is awesome and sorely miss her reporting at the Argus Leader.

  8. Fred Deutsch

    The bike has all the required lights and then some, Lynn. I use a Dinette 400 lumen rear light for my standard daytime riding light. You’re pretty close on the Hed wheels – they’re the Jet 4 Flamme Rouge model. Nice go see a politico that is bicycle savvy.

  9. Don Coyote

    Steve Hed, founder of Hed wheels just died last November at age 59. Collapsed outside of work. RIP.

    http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/wheel-innovator-steve-hed-dead-at-59

  10. Rep Deutsch,

    I was just kidding about the lights but wanted to thank everyone involved with this bill! There were a number of times I’d be about 20 miles outside of town on a double lane highway with very little traffic riding my roadbike as close to right as possible. During the ride I’d be doing shoulder checks and try to make eye contact with traffic and many times an elderly couple going to town would pass me with not much room to spare when they had an entire lane available. It is always scary when that happens knowing there is not much room for error.

    Again! I and am sure other cyclists out there really appreciate this new law!

  11. Don,

    I remember reading that. It was quite a shock with Steve being fairly young, very active, a small company and many people know each other within the cycling community. Hed has some great products!

  12. Bikes are skinny but some riders have wider hips, so the 3 foot rule is a good one. I’m just saying.

  13. Thank you for your support of this bill Fred!

    I don’t ride as much as I used to, but my kids do and after having one forced into a ditch by an inconsiderate motorist and the bill for the stitches and the cost of the parental panic, I really appreciate your efforts.

  14. I agree this bill is good, but I must be enjoying anomalously good bike luck. I cannot recall any close calls between passing motorists and myself on my bike. I haven’t been out on Brown County’s rural roads much yet, but in my riding in Lake and Lawrence counties, drivers have given me plenty of room. The problem I’ve encountered more often is oncoming traffic turning in front of me or motorists entering the roadway in front of me, underestimating the speed at which I’m approaching. I haven’t gone over any hoods or had to hit the deck yet.

  15. Continued good luck to you Cory as you explore the back roads of Brown Co. My sense is that your good judgment, anticipation, and prudent decision-making while on two wheels actually may be the reason you’ve never needed to ‘hit the deck.’
    While the new law is good public policy, the truth is that it provides no actual safety or protection for cyclists. What would help (IMO) is a public information campaign to educate motorists re: the law (and basic courtesy) and cyclists re: the need to be alert for hazards (and to operate their bikes sensibly).

  16. Thanks, Curt! Please don’t overestimate my good sense… although it has improved since my SDSU days, when I got a $20 ticket for blowing a stop sign on my bike.

    One thing that hasn’t changed in my bike judgment is my refusal to use headphones or my cell on my bike. I tried biking with earbuds in once; I felt very uncomfortable not being able to hear the road. Drivers, I’ll make a deal: I’ll keep my ears and eyes open; you do the same, please!

    You are right, Curt, that a law by itself doesn’t put concrete between me and inattentive, cell-phoning drivers. But proponents of HB 1030 said this law serves as the basis for a public awareness campaign. Heck, here we are talking about it! Expect the Department of Public Safety to follow up with more of the public outreach you’re thinking of.